THE MAGIC OF RAKING LIGHT & WATER

ANSWERS TO WHY WATER BEING ILLUMINATED BY RAKING LIGHT IS SO SUPER MAGICAL

When an object gets illuminated at an oblique angle or almost parallel to the surface, the relief and texture is easy visible. In case of water, a unique phenomena is clearly noticeable.

Normally over 90% of the light energy will penetrate into the water and only a few percent of it is noticeable as reflected light. However, in case of raking light almost all light will be reflected.

A good example is the fascinating moment of the seashore sunset. Forty minutes before sunset only 44% of the sunlight is being reflected. Twenty minutes before sunset 65% of the sunlight is being reflected and just before sunset almost 100% is being reflected. This is a rough estimation and also assuming that the see is calm.

A second unique example is a forest, completely wet and full of droplets as a result from a recent rain storm. Then, when the sun appears thousands of droplets and leaves will twinkle just because of being hit by ranking light. And over all the droplets will act as prisms and the light that is absorbed is passing through is dispersed into hundreds of colors. The wood is transferred into a magical world with thousands of huge kaleidoscopes.

Now, as a painter, I look to the world as one big playground. If you know how, where and when to look, you will observe daily all these optical phenomena’s .. right in front of you. Good moments to go out sight seeing is when the shadows are long, when the light is magical, when the weather is bad and stormy that are the best moments to see the famous Dutch Clouds and Landscapes.

With my background, as physical optical analyser engineer, I have knowledge of the theory of these optical phenomena’s. For those who are interested … its all about:

  • The Law of Snellius
  • The Law of refraction index
  • The Spectrum of Refraction

If you like … you can study it via next url’s.
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/phyopt/reflectcon.html#c1
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/geoopt/refr.html#c1